Week in Review, July 8, 2013

Te PharmaCertify™ Team

Well, here we are again…Monday already. Back to work we go, after what was hopefully a long weekend for you. While having one or two days off is refreshing, it tends to leave you a little foggy on Monday, doesn’t it? Never fear, we kept our ear to the ground throughout the July 4th holiday and what better way to jump start the week than with the News in Review.

A study finds that Canadian medical schools’ policies about interactions with industry are falling short. The study evaluated the conflict of interest policies of Canada’s seventeen medical schools in twelve categories, including samples, curriculum and scholarships. In most of the categories, only one school had what researchers considered restrictive policies. Some of the schools have developed new polices or revised existing policies since the study was conducted in 2011.

Bribery is no small matter, and a new report finds that bribery and corruption risks are on the rise. Nearly half of the businesses in the study say their bribery and corruption risks have increased in the last two years, and they expect that trend to continue in the future. Expansion into new markets and heightened enforcement are the top two reasons cited for the increase in risk. Nearly 20% of the businesses in the study said they either don’t require employees to read their anti-bribery policy or they don’t even have one in place.

Several GSK employees were detained by Chinese officials for suspected “economic crimes.” The detention follows allegations from an internal tipster. The company said it was aware of an investigation by Chinese officials, but the nature of the investigation was not known.

The London Police will soon start training businesses about the UK Bribery Act. The training, which is slated to begin in September, will be conducted in conjunction with the British Standards Institution, a business standards company. The London Police have 25 bribery cases under investigation.

Transparency is going global, as the European Federation of Pharmaceutical Industries and Associations (EFPIA) is now requiring its member companies to disclose payments and transfers of value to physicians. The requirement was adopted by the EFPIA’s board last month, and will require member companies to begin publishing the information in 2016.

Medical device manufacturer, Baxano Surgical, formerly TransS1 Inc., agreed to pay $6 million to settle allegations it violated the False Claims Act. The company was accused of causing healthcare providers to submit incorrect diagnosis or procedure codes to Medicare for the use of its spinal fusion products. The government claims the company advised providers to use a code intended for more invasive spinal procedures than those associated with use of the their own product. The company was also accused of providing kickbacks to physicians in the form of consulting and speakers fees as an inducement to use its product, and for promoting the product for unapproved uses.

The settlements for violations of global bribery law are growing in numbers and dollars. That’s why PharmaCertify’s, Understanding and Preventing Bribery in the Global Life Sciences Marketplace is designed to help your staff and representatives evaluate the degree of risk inherent with every transaction and understand the level of due diligence and monitoring needed to ensure compliance with the FCPA and the UK Bribery Act. Contact Sean Murphy at smurphy@nxlevelsolutions.com to learn more about the module.

Have a great week everyone!

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