Compliance News in Review, October 5, 2015

CMS releases a new teaching hospital list and de minimis thresholds, ICD-10 is launched, New Hampshire investigates manufacturers of painkillers, and the UK Ministry of Justice reverses its position on expansion of the law.

It is fall y’all! Okay, so the stars and the calendar may have said fall arrived a couple of weeks back, but it just doesn’t seem real until we hit October. The air gets a little crisper, the leaves start changing, and we sadly reach that point when we hope against hope that we can make it through the night without turning the thermostat to “heat.”

Before you know it, all the pumpkins and scarecrows will give way to mistletoe and snowmen (insert collective groan here). Before we all run out for the annual jump into the pile of leaves, let’s grab a cup of cider and your favorite pumpkin spice treat, and review all the compliance news fit to blog, with this edition of the Compliance News in Review.

October first was quite a busy day! First, CMS released the teaching hospital list and de minimis thresholds for Open Payments. In 2016, payments to Covered Recipients of $10.22 or higher will have to be reported and the annual aggregate reporting threshold will be $102.99.

Second, Medicines Australia’s new transparency requirements went into effect. Even though the Code of Conduct was effective in May of this year, implementation of the new transparency requirements was delayed until October. One of the major changes in the transparency requirements was the requirement to report at an individual HCP level rather than in the aggregate.

Finally, October 1st was the “go live” date for ICD -10 (International Classification of Diseases, 10th edition). ICD-10 is the set of diagnostic and procedure codes used by healthcare providers to bill insurance providers and government healthcare programs. The transition to ICD-10 was mandated by the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services and is intended to provide more detail over the previous coding system. CMS says ICD-10 will help better “accommodate future healthcare needs, facilitating timely electronic processing of claims by reducing requests for additional information to providers.” While specificity can be a good thing, could ICD-10 be taking it a bit far? Check out some of the more unique codes in the new system. A couple of our favorites are “W56.22xA- Struck by an Orca, initial encounter,” (which apparently spawned a whole book) and “W49.01XA Hair causing external constriction, initial encounter,” also known as the Flynn Rider Code.

New Hampshire is turning a cold shoulder to opioid makers. The state’s Attorney General’s Office has announced it will be investigating the marketing practices of several manufacturers of painkillers. The AG’s Office believes the companies may have engaged in fraudulent marketing practices, which may have misled doctors and patients about the addiction risks and effectiveness of drugs.

The UK is changing its colors regarding expansion of the Bribery Act. Prosecutors had been petitioning to expand the law to make it easier to prosecute businesses involved in bribery, but in response to questions from lawmakers about the proposed changes, the Ministry of Justice said it was no longer interested in pursuing the matter. The response said there was “little evidence of corporate economic wrongdoing going unpunished.”

Conflicts or confluence – decisions, decisions. A recent editorial in the Journal of the American Medical Association (JAMA) makes a case for falling away from using the phrase “conflicts of interest” when describing the secondary interests involved in clinical research. The authors suggest “confluence of interest” instead. They say “conflicts of interest” automatically sets up the notion that something wrong is taking place. The authors point out that in academia, notoriety and fame could be a stronger influence on bias than financial reward. Universities, research institutes, the NIH and medical journals can all impact bias.

October has certainly started with a bang, in the world of physician spend transparency, both here in the U.S. and abroad. The news offers a good reminder that transparency and disclosure measures are constantly evolving. Yet another change will be upon us in 2016 with the removal of the exclusion for speaker of faculty payments for accredited CME.

With all of the changes in motion, now is a perfect time to refresh your company’s training on the requirements of the Sunshine Act and Open Payments. Ensuring your team is aware of the changes is critical, and those in the field need to understand the impact the law has on the healthcare providers they interact with on a regular basis.

That’s a wrap on this edition of the Compliance News in Review. Enjoy the cool weather everyone and have a great week!

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