Wow, we’re already a week into May 2016. Time flies when you’re staying compliant. If policy writing, auditing, monitoring, or compliance training development kept you too busy to keep up with all of the April compliance news, not to worry, we have a summary of all the compliance news that was fit to blog throughout the month…with the ICYMI, April 2016 edition of the Compliance News in Review.

A new study suggests drug ads aren’t particularly effective in prompting patients to discuss the advertised drug with their doctor. In fact, only 7% of people were moved to discuss a drug with their physician after seeing a televised ad. While they may not be motivated to speak to their physician, viewers do notice the ads. The survey found that 64% of the respondents said they believed they saw more drug ads over the past year.

Shionogi received a warning letter for omitting risk information on a co-pay coupon for a drug that treats lice. The FDA said the coupon touted the efficacy of the product without stating any of the risks.

The Department of Justice announced a pilot program for companies to self-report violations of the FCPA in exchange for reduced penalties. Under the program, companies that self-report and take steps to remediate identified problems will be eligible for the reduction in penalties.

Pfizer and the DOJ announced the settlement of the case involving Pfizer’s Wyeth unit. The company agreed to pay $784.4 million to resolve charges it had reported false and fraudulent price information to the government.

Ten of Canada’s top drug firms plan to voluntarily disclose aggregate physician and healthcare organization payment data. The movement was started by GSK Canada, and multinational firms like Abbvie, Purdue, BMS, and Lilly soon joined.

CMS held a webinar for Open Payments stakeholders. The agency’s remarks focused on program timelines, in particular, the review and dispute period. A question and answer session for participants was included.

The Massachusetts Medical Society is now requiring its members to disclose financial ties to industry when posting information or reviewing a medical procedure or service on the Internet.

With the review and dispute period for Open Payments in full swing, it is good time to make sure those in customer facing roles are up to date on the requirements of the Sunshine Act, and your company’s procedures for addressing questions from covered recipients. Sunshine Act and Open Payments, from the PharmaCertify Foundations™ curriculum of eLearning modules, provides an overview of data collection and reporting responsibilities, and is easily modified to include your company-specific policy on how to handle questions from covered recipients.

Stay compliant and here’s to a merry month of May!