Executives on trial, an FCA settlement, a “clarification” to a change in the District of Columbia detailer law, and an Open Payments open forum…all in this edition of the Compliance News in Review.

What do Teddy Roosevelt, Rob Lowe, and a chair have in common? They have all provided some rather famous, if not infamous, moments at the national conventions of the Democratic and Republican parties. Part pep rally, part three-ring circus, and part critical component in the fabric of this great democracy, the conventions are underway, and they have certainly provided entertaining television during the doldrums of summer. If your senses need a break from the constant barrage of politicking and speechmaking, let us gavel in all compliance news fit to blog, with this edition of the Compliance News in Review.

Guilty or not guilty? It was a little bit of both for two executives from Acclarent, who were on trial for selling misbranded and adulterated medical devices. The jury found the pair guilty of misdemeanor charges distributing misbranded and adulterated devices, but acquitted them of felony charges. Lawyers for both defendants said they felt confident that their clients would eventually be cleared on the misdemeanor counts.

Speaking of Acclarent, the company agreed to pay $18 million to settle allegations that it caused false claims to be submitted to government health programs. The government contended the Acclarent marketed one of its devices for a use that was rejected by the FDA.

The Washington D.C. Department of Health (DOH) released an FAQ sheet that was about as clear as most political speeches. The document is intended to provide guidance regarding a recent change to the D.C. detailer law. Unfortunately, it may have raised as many questions as it answered. The DOH recently made a change establishing that anyone engaged in detailing for less than 30 consecutive days did not have to obtain a license. Confusion seems to center on the Department’s definition of “consecutive.” The FAQ states that the exemption applies to those “individuals, such as speakers at a conference, who come to the District once a year, or other persons that come once a year for a short duration of time of less than 30 consecutive days.”” Makes sense right? But the FAQ also states the exemption is not meant to cover an individual who may come to the District for a few days, more than once during a calendar year. So how many visits to D.C. require registration as a licensed detailer? Stay tuned.

The Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services (CMS) is conducting a “focus group,” of sorts. The agency is conducting a stakeholder forum on August 2 to solicit feedback on rulemaking and potential improvements to Open Payments. The forum is intended to give stakeholders an additional opportunity to comment on the recent questions posted by CMS about Open Payments in the proposed 2017 Physician Fee Schedule.

Well, that’s a wrap on this politically-charged edition of the Compliance News in Review. We now return you to your regularly scheduled convention coverage.

Stay compliant!