Compliance News in Review, January 27, 2017

The Serious Fraud Office leads the charge on Rolls-Royce’s multi-jurisdictional bribery settlement; the FDA releases new draft guidance; and a new transparency law is on the way in Maine.

While most obscure, strange, and funny “holidays” may be dismissed as whimsy, and fodder for creative water cooler conversations, Chocolate Cake Day is one that we here at the News in Review celebrate with vigor and enthusiasm. From Devil’s Food to Black Forest, we look forward to marking the occasion with more than one variation on theme. In fact, why not just make a weekend of it? Meanwhile, if a day dedicated to the splendors of chocolate cake isn’t sweet enough for you, we offer a delectable morsel of a different type, with this edition of the Compliance News in Review.

Rolls-Royce is getting its just desserts on three continents. The company recently entered into a $800 million multi-jurisdictional settlement with the UK’s Serious Fraud Office (SFO), the Department of Justice (DOJ) in the U.S. and Brazil’s Ministério Público Federal, to resolve charges it paid bribes to foreign officials in Eastern Europe, the Middle East, South America and Asia. In a twist on the usual tale, the SFO, not the DOJ was the agency spearheading the investigation. In addition to the financial penalties paid to each country, Rolls-Royce entered into deferred prosecution agreements with the U.K. and US governments, and a leniency agreement with Brazil.

The FDA is working on a new recipe for sharing healthcare economic information (HCEI). The agency released draft guidance for the sharing of HCEI with payors, formulary committees and similar entities. The guidance includes questions and answers about sharing HCEI related to investigational products with payors. The comment period for the draft guidance began January 17 and will remain open for 90 days.

On the state level, a legislator in Maine read a newspaper report about the increase in promotional spending by companies that manufacture opiods, and decided to introduce a law intended to curtail gifts from the industry to physicians. The language in the bill is based on the Minnesota gift prohibition law

Anticorruption efforts around the world are moving full steam ahead in 2017 and the fact that the SFO is spearheading investigational efforts presents a new twist. We don’t know yet if this is the start of a new trend, but we do know the SFO has the means to investigate and resolve large cases like the one with Rolls-Royce. Since the passage of the UK Bribery Act in 2011, the news around potential investigations has been quiet, but that is clearly changing. Like the U.S. Foreign Corrupt Practices Act, the UK Bribery Act has a wide reach.

Now is the time to review the training components of your anticorruption program to ensure employees, vendors and other third parties are being trained regularly about bribery laws and your company’s policies. Is that training engaging and based on real-world scenarios? Is deployment spaced over time to maximize effectiveness and retention? Have you mixed in smaller, more-focused micro-learning to reinforce topics like “identifying red flags?” Taking proactive steps now will strengthen help reduce risk and strengthen your culture around the globe for years to come.

With that, we put the wraps on this tasty edition of the Compliance News in Review. Until next time, we say, “let them (and us) eat cake!”

Thanks for reading and have a great weekend!

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