Everything’s coming up roses, off-label speech, and corruption, in this edition of the News in Review.

We’ve got the fever…Spring fever! Spring has sprung, and we couldn’t be happier. Warmer weather, more daylight, budding trees and flowers, what’s not to love (besides the severe weather, commuting in the dark, and pollen)? This Spring, the flowers aren’t the only thing blooming, though. A new edition of the Compliance News in Review has appeared in our garden.

Arizona gets to claim the first “bloom” for sharing truthful off-label information with the governor signing the Free Speech in Medicine Act into law. The law protects the free speech rights of those in the medical community to discuss truthful off-label information about FDA approved drugs. It covers speech that is “not misleading, not contrary to fact, and consistent with generally accepted scientific principles,” and only deals with discussions between pharmaceutical companies and healthcare professionals. It does not cover off-label discussions or advertisements targeted to consumers.

The FDA has stemmed the implementation of a new off-label regulation. The agency announced in the Federal Register that it would delay the effective date of a final rule related to “intended use” regulations until March of 2018. It is delaying the effective date to consider public commentary. In February, industry trade groups petitioned the FDA to indefinitely stay and reconsider the rule.

Is a late season chill on the horizon for Novartis? According to a media report, the South Korean government is considering additional penalties against the company in relation to a kickback case. The government’s Ministry of Food and Drug Safety has already imposed a fine against the company and suspended the sale of some of the company’s products. A source at the Ministry of Health and Wellness said the government was considering lowering the price of the drugs involved in the kickback case. Novartis said the court case was on going, and it wasn’t aware of an “imminent” decision from the Health Ministry.

“New life” is being breathed into the FCPA Pilot Program. At the American Bar Association’s National Institute on White Collar Crime , Acting Assistant Attorney General, Kenneth Blanco said the DOJ will evaluate the Pilot Program and determine what, if any, changes should be made. Until the evaluation is complete, the Pilot Program will remain in force. The Pilot Program, the common name for the DOJ Fraud unit’s guidance on FCPA investigations and prosecutions, was due to expire on April 5. The Pilot Program is intended to encourage individuals and companies to voluntarily self-disclose instances of corruption, and establishes requirements for voluntary self-disclosure, cooperation with investigations, and the resolution of FCPA cases.

The growth in global anticorruption settlements and activity is sure to be a hot topic at the Pharmaceutical Compliance Congress, April 26-28 in Washington, DC. The PharmaCertify™ team will be providing demos our new Compliance Foundations™ module, Global Anticorruption Laws, along with all our new and updated compliance training products, at Booth 10 on the Exhibit Floor.

See you in Washington!