11 Key Takeaways from the 3rd Annual Life Science Compliance Training Conference

Last week, we sponsored Q1 Production’s 3rd Annual Life Science Compliance Training Conference, where a highly-energized group of compliance training leaders from the pharmaceutical and medical device industries shared their ideas and techniques for making compliance training more engaging, creative and effective.

Here are my key takeaways from two great days of presentations and spirited conversation:

1. Less is more.
The idea of shorter, higher-impact training was reiterated throughout the conference and was a common theme across the presentations. One presenter said her company now limits all compliance training to 15 minutes and another said her company “hasn’t rolled out training longer than 15 minutes in two years.”

2. Remember the tone from the middle.
While “tone from the top” has been a point of emphasis in the industry for a long time, “tone from the middle” was cited as a key in multiple sessions in Chicago. “The immediate manager has to understand the message,” one presenter said, “that is who the people in the field are going to hear the message from.”

3. Communication is training too.
As one presenter put it, “anytime we can connect with an employee with something they can takeaway, it’s training.” Companies are using a variety of methods to make that connection, ranging from quick reminders via email, to video clips, resource websites, and graphic comic novels. Think outside the box and look for continuous touch points.

4. Tell a good story.
Research shows that well written stories improve learning and increase retention of critical compliance content and policies. The quality of the writing is the key. Once you find a good writer, have him or her create a story arc and develop a narrative. To save on budget in the production, use illustration instead of video. It’s less complex. The quality of the writing is as important, if not more important, than the nature of the medium.

5. Measure the metrics.
Data is important and even the “soft” metrics like feedback from the learners and the managers, testing results, changes in audit data, and increases in hotline reports, are important when identifying what curriculum adjustments are necessary. Data is important, so much so that one presenter noted that she recently hired a “data analytics person” to see what else they can learn.

6. The principles-based approach to compliance is here to stay.
The principles-based approach to compliance was introduced years ago and it has clearly become a trend in the life science industry. Multiple presenters discussed the need to empower personnel with the ability to make decisions, rather than just training on the rules. As one presenter put it, “let them make their decisions about what is the right thing to do, and let them know where to get the answers if they are uncomfortable making the decisions.”

7. GXP compliance training requires a different approach.
This one was a surprise and was raised in response to questions from the audience. Several presenters noted that they are also responsible for GXP compliance training and the nature of the content and the expectations of the learners require a much more traditional approach to training. Essentially, a rules-based approach is much more necessary when dealing with manufacturing compliance.

8. Create a brand.
To quote one presenter, “companies spend millions of dollars branding products, so why not brand compliance training?” Branding gives you more opportunities to creatively communicate the key concepts and messaging. Brand the policies and the principles to create a coordinated and clear message.

9. One size does not fit all.
When developing compliance training, keep the learner’s application of the content in mind. In other words, make it relevant to the learners. Use scenarios that reflect risks they are likely to encounter. As one presenter stated, “training needs to be risk-based, and you need to train on the topics that are core to your business.”

10. Relationships count.
Getting stakeholder buy in on the training at every stage (development/delivery/completion) is critical. Don’t just focus on the proverbial seat at the table with upper management, develop relationships across the company, and seek feedback from the business groups, sales managers, and sales training.

11. And finally, beware of the speaker programs!
When evaluating risks, make those speaker programs a priority.

Kudos to Q1 productions, the presenters, and everyone involved in the 3rd Annual Life Science Compliance Training Conference. From the opening audience ice-breaker, to the closing session, it was one of the most informative, focused, and engaging conferences I have attended in ten years of working in life science compliance.

I look forward to next year’s conference and I highly recommend it to anyone interested in sharing ideas and hearing what others in the industry are doing to make their curricula more engaging and more effective.

Thanks for reading!

Sean Murphy
Product and Marketing Manager
PharmaCertify by NXLevel Solutions

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