4th Annual Life Sciences Compliance Congress for Specialty Products: A Preview

CBI’s Compliance Congress for Specialty Products kicks off next Thursday, September 13th in Boston, and Dan O’Connor, Senior Vice President for PharmaCertify, will be there to catch up with our clients and colleagues and hear industry leaders and government regulators share strategies for proactively addressing current risks for specialty pharmaceutical manufacturers.

We’ve reviewed the conference agenda and here are the sessions and presentations we are looking forward to in particular:

Day One, Thursday, September 13

Prosecutors’ Perspectives Panel

Following the opening keynote address, the conference begins with this prosecutor panel focused on biotech and specialty pharma companies. Charles Grabow, Assistant US Attorney from New Jersey, and Gregg Shapiro, Chief of the Affirmative Civil Enforcement Unit for the DOJ in Boston, will be joined by Jane Yoon from Paul Hastings, LLP, to discuss the high-risk areas for this unique industry group. Government panels typically offer some of the most compelling and important information during conferences and since this conference is focused on such a defined segment of the industry, the conversation should be revealing and educational.

Coping Strategies for the Lonely Compliance Officer

In addition to having the most creative name of any of the presentations, this session features three professionals facing the challenges that come with being a compliance professional for an emerging pharmaceutical company. We will be curious to hear how Heather Godling from Sobi, Francisco Ribeiro of Tesaro, and Sarah Whipple at Akebia Therapeutics, creatively utilize the limited personnel and resources available to them to build and maintain a strong culture of compliance.

Expert Panel: Evaluate the Risks Associated with Disease State Awareness and Other Pre-Launch Activities

The “Pre-Launch Activities” part of this title caught my eye. No matter their growth stage, all companies need to be aware of the compliance risks and concerns they face now and as they progress toward launch. That extends to compliance policies regarding interactions with healthcare practitioners. Ideally, compliance training for a new sales team should be built and planned before the product is commercialized.

Ensure Transparency in Contributions to Independent Patient Assistance Foundations
And
Reboot Your Approach to Patient Assistance Programs (PAPs) and Reimbursement HUB Support  

Patient support programs are an emerging enforcement trend in the pharmaceutical industry as more and more companies enter into settlements at least partly related to the programs (e.g., Aegerion, United Therapeutics, Jazz Pharmaceuticals). Add the high cost of specialty pharmaceutical products to the mix, and it’s no surprise that CBI has scheduled back-to-back sessions on this important topic.

Day Two, Friday, September 14

Daybreak Discussion: Specialty Café – Forecasting Priorities from Now to 2020

In a novel presentation structure spread across two consecutive time slots (8:15 – 8:40 and 8:45 – 9:10), attendees will have the opportunity to sit in small groups, share ideas and listen to their peers discuss three timely topics: Risk-based Approaches for Advanced Therapies; PBM Contracting Considerations; and Compliant Medical Affairs and Commercial Interactions. The format offers a welcome twist  from the typical large group presentation and should lead to a compelling exchange of peer-to-peer ideas. It’s a great idea.

Explore the Trends in Drug Pricing Legislation and Other State Initiatives

John Oroho, from Porzio Life Sciences, LLC, is a respected and established thought leader in the life sciences compliance industry and his presentation is a can’t miss opportunity to hear the latest news and regulatory updates on these two ever-evolving topics.

Scale Up Your Compliance Program for Global Operations

Going global can be fraught with risk and compliance traps. In terms of anti-bribery alone, pharmaceutical companies need to now consider Loi Bertrand, the EFPIA Code, the Medicines Australia Code of Conduct, and a cadre of emerging codes and regulations around the world.  These on-going changes in the global landscape make the presentation by Masha Chestukhin of Sanofi, and Darryl Williams of MediSpend, an important pre-lunch session.

GDPR is Here – Now What Do We Do?

Are you confused about the General Protection Privacy Regulation (aka, GDPR) and its impact on you as a pharmaceutical compliance professional? You’re not alone. The questions concerning details like data inventory and documentation abound, and what exactly does it mean when data subjects have the “right to be forgotten?” What about training? Who needs to be trained? How does it impact the field employees interacting with HCPs? We look forward to hearing answers, ideas and opinions from David Ryan, Vice President, Associate General Counsel, Chief Compliance Officer at Epizyme and Trish Shorey, Privacy Officer, Global Compliance and Risk Management at Shire.

If you’re attending the conference, we want to hear from you. Let us know what you think of the sessions and presenters, and conference content. And of course, if you see Dan, he’d be happy to share demos of our newest compliance training solutions and discuss how we help clients build a stronger culture of compliance and reduce risk.  

Thanks for reading!

Week in Review, May 6, 2015

Connecticut delays the implementation date for its the APRN reporting law, CMS releases 2013 Medicare Part D data, the Medicines Australia Code of Conduct is approved, and lawmakers release draft legislation that includes an exclusion for reporting CME payments under Sunshine.

Avengers Assemble! The highly anticipated Avengers: Age of Ultron, opened last weekend and apparently a lot of us assembled for the opening. The film managed to land the second largest opening weekend box office numbers in history. Considering the title holder is the first Avengers movie, coming in second isn’t that much of a loss for the franchise. You won’t find any spoilers here…after all, not all of the Compliance News in Review staff have seen it yet.

The next Avengers movie is slated for 2018, but in the meantime we can look forward to 2017 and the new Guardians of the Galaxy movie…and of course, collecting spend data for APRNs in Connecticut.  The State has once again delayed the implementation date for the law, which requires drug and device manufacturers to report transfers of value to APRNs.

$103 billion: Tony Stark’s net worth or Medicare drug spending? If you answered Medicare drug spending, you are correct. CMS released data revealing the prescriptions that were covered by Medicare Part D in 2013 and the names of the doctors who wrote the scripts. The costliest drug was Nexium at $2.5 billion, and the most prescribed drug was Lisinopril (cost $300M). PhRMA said the data does not reflect the substantial rebates pharmaceutical companies pay to Medicare. The American Medical Association said the data could be misleading because the dose and strength of the medication is not included in the information. Doctors often change the dosage or strength when patients don’t respond as expected.

After extensive negotiations, the Australian Competition and Consumer Commission (ACCC) has approved Medicines Australia’s Code of Conduct. Much to the chagrin of industry critics, the ACCC went along with a change that will impose a $120 spending limit on meals and beverages provided to physicians. The “opt out” loophole has also been removed. The Code goes into effect in mid-May.

Lawmakers introduced a draft legislation “sequel” that includes an exclusion for most payments associated with CME from the Sunshine Act reporting requirements. The move to exclude the requirements was applauded by the head of the CME Coalition. The legislation is part of the larger 21st Century Cures effort, and is a paired down version of a draft that was originally introduced in January. Drug makers would also be able to share health economic information about products with physicians.

With that, we have reached the end of this week’s compliance tale. Speaking of the Medicines Australia Code of Conduct, the new PharmaCertify™ module, Global Transparency: Reporting HCP and HCO Transfers of Value includes up-to-date covering the policy, as well as the EFPIA Disclosure Code and Loi Bertrand in France. Contact Sean Murphy at smurphy@nxlevelsolutions.com for more information.

Have a great week everyone!

Compliance Week in Review, March 15, 2015

A French court overturns the fee for service exclusion from Loi Bertrand, a dental company settles with the Vermont AG’s office over failure to report charges, an internal investigation at Teva reveals potential FCPA violations, and a representative from the SEC discusses the FCPA with a group of life sciences compliance professionals.

Well, we’ve survived another shift to Daylight Saving Time and we’ve had a few days to adjust and reset our internal clocks…yeah right. There isn’t enough caffeine in the world, is there? That spring forward thing certainly leaves us here at the Week in Review offices feeling anything but springy! As it is, we’re in Daylight Saving Time now, like it or not (unless of course you live in AZ, or a handful of U.S. Territories that have the good sense not to jump on this bandwagon), and while the clock may shift, the news waits for no one. So sit back, relax, but not too much, as we spring into this week’s News Week in Review.

The times they are a changing, and so is the French Sunshine Act. The top French administrative court reversed the decision by the Ministry of Social and Health Affairs to exclude the amount paid to healthcare professionals and organizations for fee for service contracts from manufacturer reports. Currently, manufacturers only need to report the existence of the contract. The court said that Ministry overstepped its bounds with the decision. The Ministry is evaluating the implications of court’s decision, and will issue new regulations at some point in the future.

Better make time to send in those disclosure reports to Vermont! A dental company settled a case with the Vermont Attorney General’s office for $45,000 over its alleged failure to submit disclosure reports. This is the second settlement in a month involving the disclosure law.

Through a securities filing, TEVA revealed it had uncovered information that some of its actions may have violated the FCPA. The company’s investigation began after it received subpoenas from the DOJ and SEC. The investigation centered on business practices is in Russia, Eastern Europe and Latin America.

A representative from the Securities and Exchange Commission (SEC) shed some light on the subject of FCPA risks for life sciences companies at the recent Pharmaceutical Compliance Congress. Andrew Ceresney, Director of Enforcement athem nt the SEC, focused on three key areas of risks, pay-to-prescribe arrangements, (rewarding doctors for writing prescriptions), payment of bribes in exchange for being placed on a formulary, and the payments of bribes disguised as charitable donations.

Ceresney also pointed out the importance of establishing internal controls specific to the business, and updating the internal controls when the business changes or grows. He referred to dealings with the FDA as the “lifeblood” of the industry, and emphasized the importance of investors having accurate information when making critical decisions.

And that brings us to the end of this Daylight Saving Time edition of the Compliance Week in Review. Remember, if you’re compliance training curriculum is in need of a wakeup call, the PharmaCertify™ suite of solutions offers up-to-date compliance training and reference content where your team needs its most – in the field and at their fingertips.

Have a great week everyone, and don’t forget that extra cup of coffee.