“Dear Connie the Compliance Training Specialist” is back!

Welcome to this edition of “Dear Connie the Compliance Training Specialist,” where we answer questions about timely compliance topics and delve into the best training for reducing risk.

This week: raising knowledge retention at the next POA.

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Dear Connie,

During the compliance portion of our last Plan of Action meeting, I introduced several scenarios for group discussion with the hope of making the session more engaging. For the most part, I think it was more successful than just reviewing a slide deck (our usual approach), but not everyone was engaged and I’m not sure they’re going to remember the key points. Any suggestions for our next workshop?

Signed,

Bewildered in Bridgewater

Dear Bewildered,

Kudos to you for making the effort to move beyond the “PowerPoint Overload” approach to live compliance training. To engage the entire audience, I suggest you “gamify” the discussion and have everyone team up to solve scenario-based challenges. Research has shown that creating a competitive environment raises the retention of key lessons and makes the content stick with the learners.

Here are a few suggestions that can add a level of interactivity, even if the time allotted to compliance is limited:

Form Teams

Competition is more fun and learning is enhanced when groups of participants work together to solve the scenario. Instead of asking individuals in the audience to give their opinion, create teams of participants based on regions, products, or any number of qualifiers. To save time at the session, create the teams ahead of time, in the planning stage.

Add Activities

Don’t just ask the teams to present their best suggestions for a scenario. Add activities that stimulate cooperation within the team. For instance, you can employ a card-sort exercise with scenario “flashcards” the teams sort into two piles, e.g., “permissible” and “not permissible.”

Teams can also compete against one another to solve a scenario-based “mystery” using their understanding of compliance best practices and company policies. Provide clues (emails, call transcripts, receipts, and text messages) during the workshop or ahead of time via email.

The activities can be developed in analog (paper-based) form or electronically through an online gaming platform or outside vendor.

Keep Score

Enhance the competitive spirit even more with a leaderboard that you update manually or electronically. Display the board continuously during workshop, or only after each activity is completed. If you send out questions in the weeks before the workshop, tell the learners they get points for how quickly they respond and for accuracy. Add those scores to the leaderboard as well.

Remember the Debrief

Don’t forget to leave time to debrief the audience once the activities are completed. You need to make sure the nuances and “gray areas” are understood, and the participants understand which company policies to reference for on-going guidance around the topics that were covered.

These are just a few tactics for raising the retention rate and “making live compliance learning stick.” My friends here at the compliance training division of NXLevel Solutions have experience creating compliance workshops for a range of life sciences clients. Feel free to contact them at 609-483-6875 to hear more ideas.

Thanks for the great question!

Connie the Compliance Training Specialist

Kicking Out Kickbacks in the Medical Device Industry

The federal Anti-Kickback Statute prohibits the exchange of anything of value to induce or reward the referral of federal health care program business. Business processes that are perfectly legitimate in other industries, like entertaining clients, or providing gifts to prospects, can be tricky in the medical device industry. Identifying the activities hold the potential to implicate the Anti-Kickback Statute is key to reducing risk across a medical device company.

Here are five areas to evaluate for risk:

Device Loaners/Evaluation Units
Device loaners and evaluation units are big risks. Be sure to provide only as many units as needed for evaluation, and for no longer than is necessary for the evaluation. If the loaner is provided to temporarily replace a broken unit, make sure the loan period does not continue past the time necessary to complete the service work.

Pricing Discounts
Pricing discounts require a level of transparency on the part of the seller and the buyer. Purchase agreements must clearly disclose the discount, and purchasers should be advised in writing that they too need to disclose the discount when they submit information to federal healthcare programs for reimbursement.

Gifts, Meals, Travel
Providing meals, gifts, travel and hospitality to an individual who is in a position to purchase, or recommend the use of a product, is risky. Gifts that do not have an educational benefit for the recipient or patients are particularly problematic.

When a gift is provided, the value should be nominal and cash or cash equivalents are never appropriate. Avoid lavish meals, and make sure meals occur in locations that are conducive to holding a business, educational, or scientific discussion. Finally, do not provide lavish travel or hospitality for company training or meetings.

Consulting Agreements
Remember to establish the objectives for consulting engagements with healthcare professionals (HCPs) prior to the start of the business relationship and only use as many consultants as needed to achieve the objectives. Timelines need to be included in the agreement and the consultants must be compensated at fair market value. The consulting relationship needs to be disclosed during the program.

Grants and Donations
Establish processes to objectively evaluate requests for grants and donations. Support should not be awarded to induce or reward the purchase or recommendation of product. Support of educational grants should not be contingent on the ability to select faculty or determine content of the program.

Medical Device Anti-Kickback Training
Our Compliance Foundations medical device eLearning modules cover critical topics such as the Anti-Kickback Statute, interactions with healthcare professionals, transparency, and speaker programs. Course titles include The AdvaMed Code; Global Anticorruption Laws; Medical Device Compliance Overview; and On-label Promotion. To see a demo and learn more, please contact Dan O’Connor at doconnor@nxlevelsolutions.com or 609-483-6875.

Thanks for reading!

Lauren Barnett, Senior Compliance Specialist

The 2017 Compliance Year in Review!

As the year winds to a close, we take a break from the hustle and bustle of holiday preparations to reflect on the 2017 trends, topics, and focal points from the world of life sciences compliance. It’s been a busy year, with some expected updates, along with a few surprises, filling our News in Review missives from month to month. So, grab a cup of egg nog, fire up the Yule Log on YouTube, and enjoy this “year in review” edition of the Compliance News in Review.

Drug pricing transparency was a hot topic at the end of 2016, and the trend carried through 2017. The rules for Chicago’s new sales representative licensure law, which is intended to help combat opioid addiction, went into effect. The law requires representatives to obtain a license to sell products in the city and to document their interactions with healthcare professionals. In California, drug manufacturers must now notify the State and other payers in advance when they intend to raise the wholesale acquisition cost of a drug over a certain percentage, and when new drugs are expected to have a wholesale acquisition cost that exceeds the Medicare Part D specialty drug threshold. Nevada passed similar legislation, but its law focuses on diabetes drugs. Nevada also requires sales representatives to be licensed and provide reports of their interactions with HCPs. Finally, Louisiana also jumped on the pricing transparency train.

In an effort to combat the opioid crisis,  Governor Christie in New Jersey issued rules that cap payments made to healthcare professionals by pharmaceutical companies.  Maine passed a gift ban law similar to the existing Minnesota law and, not surprisingly, we heard from Vermont in 2017. The attorney general there is reportedly investigating whether drug and device companies are adhering to the state’s HCP gift ban law.

Not all state-level action was successful. Missouri’s proposed price transparency law did not pass during the past legislative session, and a bill in California to restrict gifts and payments to HCPs passed the state Senate, but was rejected in the Assembly.

Pharmaceutical support for patient assistance charities was another 2016 hot topic that continued through 2017.  An IRS investigation into one of the charities focused on whether it provided an improper benefit to pharmaceutical donors by using the donations to purchase the drugs manufactured by those same companies. Support of patient assistance charities also figured into one company’s healthcare fraud criminal and civil settlement with the government.

2017 was a quiet year for the Office of Prescription Drug Promotion (OPDP). During December of 2016, the agency dropped a flurry of letters, but 2017 will likely see record low in activity with only three letters being issued so far for the entire year.

This was an interesting year in bribery and corruption enforcement. It began with a bang in January as the Serious Fraud Office entered into its first major Deferred Prosecution Agreement. With a changing of the guard in the U.S., FCPA actions were more subdued, but the diagnostic test company, Alere, settled with the Securities and Exchange Commission over improper payments to foreign officials allegedly made by its Colombian and Indian subsidiaries.

The Department of Justice (DOJ) published its Compliance Program Evaluation Guidance in 2017. The document offers details on what the agency considers to be an effective compliance program. Perhaps most notably, the DOJ made its Foreign Corrupt Practices Act Pilot Program permanent. The pilot program ended in early 2017, but it was effectively made permanent with the announcement of a new FCPA Enforcement Policy. Like the pilot program, the new policy encourages companies to self-report possible FCPA violations and rewards companies for their  cooperation during investigations.

With that, we close out another issue of the Compliance News in Review, and another year in the wonderful world of life sciences compliance. We look forward to keeping you up-to-date on all compliance news fit to blog in 2017 and continuing to provide you with an ever-expanding suite of PharmaCertify compliance training products and services.

Thank you for reading. Have a warm and wonderful holiday season and a happy New Year!

The Do’s and Don’ts of Compliant Product Promotion

In keeping with our mission of helping you reduce risk and strengthen your compliance culture, we present our top do’s and don’ts for promoting products to healthcare professionals:

  1. Do…be balanced and accurate! Present the benefits and the risks of a product equally.
    Don’t…omit or minimize the risks associated with the use of a product, or exaggerate its effectiveness.
  2. Do…stay on-label! All promotional statements about a product must adhere to the product label.
    Don’t…promote any off-label uses of a product.
  3. Do…use approved promotional materials! Use promotional materials provided and approved by the company to promote a product.
    Don’t…Use retired promotional materials or create your own materials to promote a product. Do not add logos, names or other product information to candies, cookies, or other items, without prior approval.
  4. Do…be careful about comparisons! Only share competing product information that has been approved by the company.
    Don’t…Make unsubstantiated comparative claims about a competitor’s product.
  5. Do…spread the knowledge! Share approved scientific publications or journal reprints with healthcare professionals.
    Don’t…alter any approved publications before you share them with the approved audience.

Thanks for reading!