Off-the-Shelf Compliance Training Myths

Myth #3: It won’t run properly on my learning management system.

In this third installment of our series on the myths associated with off-the-shelf compliance training, I discuss the concern that only training sold in conjunction with an LMS, or other type of online content delivery system, will run properly and accurately record data with that LMS. This theory is based on the idea that training modules from other vendors are not developed with the specifications of that system and therefore hold the potential for technical difficulties and “clunky” performance.

So, if you’ve already committed to an online compliance training content management system, the only way to ensure eLearning modules function correctly is to utilize the training that is packaged with the system, right? In a word…no.

The Myth 

Companies selling whole compliance training systems are understandably interested in fostering the notion that customers have no need to search elsewhere for training after they have made the commitment to purchase an enterprise-wide system to manage and deliver compliance training. The modules are a natural extension of the core product and offer myriad opportunities to garner additional revenue throughout the life of the system contract.

Adding fuel to the “it won’t run properly” fire is the idea that since there are so many varieties and brands of systems available to life sciences companies, including the large, well-known names; small systems targeted to compliance; industry upstarts; and systems intended more for GMP training where 21 CFR Part 11 compliance is a requirement, consistent performance across all platforms must inherently be a difficult, if not impossible, challenge. It’s a logical conclusion, even when SCORM compliance is factored into the compatibility equation as indicated by the fact that LMS compatibility continues to be one of the first questions our clients ask when we map out a strategy for deploying our Compliance Foundations™ off-the-shelf eLearning modules.

The Reality

If an LMS is built to modern specifications by a technical team that understands the need for it to house a range of training types, and the training is built with an eye toward flexibility and SCORM compliance, compatibility and performance of the individual components should never pose a problem. An effective compliance training curriculum requires a thoughtful and well-planned mix of training modalities delivered continuously across a learner’s timeline. That formula sometimes consists of elements from a variety of development vendors and the ultimate success of that curriculum must never be threatened by the limitations or lack of flexibility on which the training is housed.

So not only is the suggestion that off-the-shelf training won’t run properly on a wide range of systems a misleading and counterproductive myth, it is anathema to the very notion of what is at the foundation of successful compliance training.

The Bottom Line

In 15 years of delivering online life sciences compliance training, the technical team behind PharmaCertify has never faced an LMS communication and compatibility issue we could not overcome quickly and efficiently. The training we build for our pharmaceutical and medical clients is launched on systems large, small, and everything in between. Communication with the LMS team on the client side is key and early in the project, we learn the specifications of the system and provide a test module to that team to ensure seamless integration into the LMS.

Since we work with companies in various stages of training preparedness, including some that do not have an LMS in place, we also offer our Access LMS as a cost-efficient solution for deploying training to employees and third-party vendors alike. But, no matter the LMS, our first goal is to ensure your training reaches your learners according to your planned schedule and without technical concerns, and the critical completion and reporting data you need to verify learner compliance with your training curriculum is accurate, accessible, and reliable.

To see a demo of the PharmaCertify compliance training solutions, including the Access LMS, contact Dan O’Connor at doconnor@nxlevelsolutions.com.

Thanks for reading!

Off-the-Shelf Compliance Training Myths

Myth #2: It’s Not Really Targeted to the Life Sciences Industry

In this installment of our series on the myths and realities associated with off-the-shelf compliance training, I cover the common concern that off-the-shelf compliance and ethics training is not effective because it is so rarely focused on the life sciences and the only way to get targeted training is to build from the ground up.

The Myth 

All too often, life sciences companies purchase off-the-compliance training designed with generic content that is somehow intended to be applicable to any industry. This especially holds true when training is sold under the banner of ethics training. After all, ethics is ethics, no matter the industry…at least that is the sales pitch from companies who sell generic compliance training.

Unfortunately, the aggressive marketing and sales efforts of those companies perpetuate the myth among many life science companies that custom-development is the only training option that will meet their needs. Unknowing compliance professionals think they have only two bad options: 1) purchase generic training, or 2) hire a generalist training developer to build expensive modules from scratch, with the added burden of having to provide subject matter expertise to the training developer (As if they don’t have enough to do already!). There is a better approach, one that can be both efficient and cost-effective.

The Reality

Those pedaling generic compliance training may insist otherwise, but effective life sciences compliance training absolutely requires content targeted to the pharmaceutical or medical device industries. The intricacies and details of the risks in our industry are far too unique to expect learners to find real value in generic training. But that doesn’t mean the only path to quality training is through custom development. Off-the-shelf training, with content developed by industry experts and vetted by your peers in the industry, is readily available for customization and launch.

Interactions with Healthcare Professionals Compliance Foundations eLearning Module

Our Compliance Foundations™ eLearning modules cover the topics those working in the life sciences industry need to effectively reduce the risk inherent to their job responsibilities. Off-the-shelf courses include Good Promotional Practices; Interactions with Healthcare Professionals; Healthcare Compliance Overview; On-label Promotion; and Managing Speaker Program Risk to name a few. The modules are designed for easy customization, so your language, policies, and practices are easily woven into the content. And our modules can be launched on any SCORM-compliance learning management system…either the one you have in place or our cost-effective LMS.

The Bottom Line

There is a better way. You don’t deserve to have to settle for generic compliance training. You can have off-the-shelf content that is specifically targeted to the risks in our industry and the ability to further customize the training specifically to your company. You also don’t need to always build from scratch to ensure the content is relevant and optimized for the risks your learners face every day as they interact with healthcare professionals and conduct their work-related activities.

But don’t just take my word for it when you can see for yourself. Follow the four steps below to access demos of the Compliance Foundations™, and see first-hand, the level of industry focus we bring to our modules.

  1. Visit http://www.pharmacertify.com/demo/interactions_hcps/start_course.htm
  2. Follow the navigation prompts to review the demo.
  3. Visit http://pharmacertify.com/foundations-compliance-training.html to see short descriptions of all of our Compliance Foundations modules.
  4. Contact Tessa Hoyer at thoyer@nxlevelsolutions.com for course outlines and to learn more.

Thanks for reading!

A Preview of the 4th Annual Life Science Ethics & Compliance Training Conference

PharmaCertify is a proud sponsor of the 4th Annual Life Science Ethics & Compliance Training Conference scheduled for June 5th and 6th in Chicago. As someone who has spent the last 12 years in the field of life sciences compliance training, I find the focus of this annual conference especially compelling as industry leaders and consultants share ideas, tips, and experiences for reducing risk through innovative training. It’s an exciting and energized group of presenters every year. Below are some of the presentations I find to be of note this year. You can learn more about the conference and download a full agenda at https://www.q1productions.com/compliancetraining/. Contact us about our sponsor discount if you are interested in registering.

Day 1: Wednesday, June 5

Day 1 will be chaired by PharmaCertify’s own Dan O’Connor, and after the opening ice-breaker, the conference begins in earnest with a keynote panel titled, Assessing Risk Tolerance & Company Culture as a Driver for Ethics and Compliance Education. Kudos to the conference organizers for scheduling a great kickoff session. Building an effective compliance training curriculum begins with a thorough risk assessment and I am looking forward to hearing the details of each presenter’s process for “shaping training based on tolerance, and conveying liabilities to ultimately create a culture of compliant and ethical behavior…”

Following the keynote panel, a multi-part session from 10:00 AM to Noon begins with the Legal Interpretation of Enforcement Trends & Areas of Inspection presentation. The talking points on the agenda include the first official reference to the new and trending topic of patient assistance programs. That theme continues later in the day with a case study from Catherine Starks of Sidley Austin, Risk Evaluation & Training Approaches for Compliant Patient Assistance Programs.  With PAPs and PSPs programs being the focus of recent corporate integrity agreements, any discussion of the associated risks and the best practices for conducting compliant programs is worthwhile.

The first session after the lunch break, Developing a Compliance Training Cadence Based on Risk & Needs of Business caught my if for only one word: cadence. The rhythm and pace at which compliance training is launched across a life sciences company is critical to the success of that training. Microlearning is all the rage lately and effective microlearning is more about the frequency and schedule at which training is delivered than it is about the length of the individual learning components. In this session, the presenter will discuss the factors affecting that cadence, including establishing a “cadence to coincide with business agendas and timetables to inform stakeholders at optimal moments.”

Two case studies on the topic of “measuring training effectiveness and risk reduction” are scheduled for the afternoon and I am excited to hear the speakers from Exsurco and Gilead detail their strategies for tracking retention and engagement, and as described in the agenda, “translating the data into actionable strategy.”

Day 2: Thursday, June 6

Day 2 kicks off with one of the more intriguingly-titled sessions from this or any conference: Masterclass: Effectively Maintaining Training Priorities Upon Exiting a Corporate Integrity Agreement. The end of a CIA presents a great opportunity for companies to incorporate the lessons learned during the term of the CIA, when training schedules and the modules were under the demands of the agreement and create a curriculum even more dynamic in terms of scope and levels of engagement. I look forward to hearing Maureen Mason of AstraZeneca discuss her philosophy and suggestions for maintaining the diligence of a strict curriculum while expanding and enhancing the company’s compliance curriculum.

“Cadence” isn’t the only word that jumped off the screen when I initially reviewed the conference agenda. The sessions scheduled after the 10:00 AM coffee and networking break (don’t forget to visit us at the PharmaCertify booth to see demos of our newest training products), Multi-Part Case Study: Contextual Compliance Risk Evaluation in Prioritizing Training caught my eye for the use of one word: contextual. In our 15th year developing compliance training for life sciences, the team at PharmaCertify has worked with compliance departments ranging from an “n of 1”, to those that have a full team of internal resources. And while context does matter, ultimately results are what count no matter the number of resources. In this case, the large corporation perspective will be provided by Abbvie, the mid-sized by a speaker from Convatec, and the “limited resources” perspective by Otsuka.

After the lunch break, two breakout groups are divided by industry, in sessions titled, Compliance Considerations Specific to Pharmaceutical & Medical Device Organizations. I am glad to see the focus on the medical device industry, which too often is not as well represented at conferences. Two speakers from Teleflex will provide the me device experience and their talking points include updates to the AdvaMed Code of Conduct; compliant interactions & “no touch;” and the EU General Data Protection Regulation.

The afternoon of Day 2 includes a session on third-party vendors: Managing Distributor Partner Compliance Training. The intricacies of doing business through third-party vendors hold the potential for increased risks compliance violations. It’s a critical topic and any opportunity to hear tips and suggestions related to training, tracking and managing global vendors is worthwhile and valuable.

Discounted Conference Registration

The 4th Annual Life Science Ethics & Compliance Training Conference is scheduled for June 5-6, in Chicago, Illinois and if you’re interested in hearing industry leaders share their experiences and best practices, there is still time to register. Contact me at smurphy@nxlevelsolutions.com to take advantage of our discount registration rate. I can’t recommend this conference more highly!

Thanks for reading!

Sean Murphy
Product and Marketing Manager
PharmaCertify by NXLevel Solutions

Off-the-Shelf Compliance Training: Myth vs. Reality

Myth #1: Off-the-Shelf Training Doesn’t Align with My Content Requirements

Welcome to the first installment of our series on the myths and realities associated with off-the-shelf compliance training. In each post, we will dive into one commonly heard myth concerning the pros and cons of using off-the-shelf eLearning to reduce compliance risk in the life sciences industry. We begin this week with the frequent lament, “off-the-shelf training doesn’t align with my content requirements.”

The Myth 

Multiple presenters at the 2019 Pharmaceutical Compliance Congress emphasized the importance of targeting training to the audience. As one speaker said, “scientists are not going find value in training that features scenarios with sales representatives.” He ended his comments by saying that is why he only uses custom-developed training.

In addition, in its recently updated guidance on the evaluation of corporate compliance programs, the Department of Justice emphasizes the need for “appropriately tailored training and communications.” When describing what prosecutors should take into consideration when evaluating a company’s program, the DOJ asks, “has the company provided tailored training for high-risk and control employees, including training that addresses risk in the area where the misconduct occurred?”

Clearly, government regulators and industry leaders recognize the importance of targeting training to the roles and risks associated with individual learner groups. And the belief that only fully-custom training can meet those requirements is predictable and understandable.

But is it reality?

The Case for Off-the-Shelf

Knowledge Check from the Compliance Foundations eLearning module: Healthcare Compliance Overview

While I agree wholeheartedly about the need to target the audience and use role-appropriate content, well-designed off-the-shelf training allows for extensive customization, in a streamlined, cost-efficient manner.

Consider Healthcare Compliance Overview, a module from our library of Compliance Foundations eLearning courses. The module covers a broad range of commercial compliance topics, including the False Claims Act, off-label promotion, HIPAA, good product promotion, and the Anti-Kickback Statute so our clients typically launch it to their full staffs. Most of our clients customize the content to reflect the needs of specific learner groups, e.g. sales, medical, clinical, and corporate. Since the modules are built in a “templated” format, the process is simplified and the cost is less than custom-developed training.

Healthcare Compliance Overview features knowledge checks instructionally designed to reinforce key objectives throughout the module. The knowledge checks are often written in the form of scenarios that reflect “real-life” experiences some learner groups are likely to face in their daily activities. Since the modules are so easy to customize, our clients roll out multiple “versions” of the module, each one tailored to the appropriate audience. The result: highly professional and engaging customized compliance training at less cost than custom training.

The Bottom Line

Custom development certainly offers the opportunity to tailor compliance training to various learner groups within a life sciences company, but it comes with a steep price and lengthy development timeline. Delivering appropriately targeted off-the-shelf compliance training throughout the company is not only possible, but it is often the optimal solution based on budget and time frame. Just be sure the off-the-shelf training offers the right level of flexibility.

Launching off-the-shelf compliance training, customized for your learners, is a simple four-step process with PharmaCertify:

  1. Review your risks and goals with our team.
  2. Select from our Compliance Foundations curriculum.
  3. Make our content your content through the customization process.
  4. Launch your training!

Contact me at smurphy@nxlevelsolutions.com to learn more about our customization process.

Thanks for reading!

Connie the Compliance Training Manager Tackles New Hire Training!

Welcome to a new edition of “Dear Connie, the Compliance Training Specialist,” where Connie answers questions about life science compliance training concepts and discusses new ideas for making that training more effective.

This week: Connie hears from a compliance training manager looking for a more exciting way to train new sales representatives.

Dear Connie,

I know I should change my new hire compliance training session for the sales representatives because my PowerPoint deck might be getting a little stale, but I only get an hour in front of them, so I don’t really have time for a more creative approach. Any suggestions?

Concerned Compliance Manager in Cambridge


Dear Concerned,

You may be surprised to hear that an hour is more than enough time to conduct a more engaging and more memorable live training session. Now is the time to ditch that overused and dull PowerPoint deck!

Make it More Competitive

Research shows that learners are motivated by competition. So how about creating a Jeopardy-style game format with questions designed around your company’s policies and risks? In my experience, five categories, with five questions per category, fills an hour of time. Make sure you take a few minutes after each question to explain why the answer is right or wrong and ask the participants for examples of similar situations they have faced.

Depending on the size of your audience, I suggest you pick 3-5 participants per team to “represent” groups in the audience and have representatives buzz in once they think they know the answer. It’s a great way to take the learning to another level and create an interactive experience where ideas are exchanged with the audience. One warning: have someone there with a timer to make sure they don’t buzz in and then take forever to figure out the answer.

Make it More Engaging

You could also create an interactive workshop where the participants are divided into groups and asked to “solve” compliance scenarios together. Break the workshop into two activities to keep it moving and make sure each team has a tablet or laptop on a table. I like the idea of a Compliance Sprint as the first activity. Have the teams solve a series of exercises (a card sort works well) based on situations they are likely to encounter in the field.

You could also mix in a Compliance Mystery. The same teams play compliance “detective” and solve more complex scenarios with the help of a series of clues. The clues can be emails, phone call transcripts, business cards from a meeting, or whatever clues help provide hints about the scenario. Be creative and make it fun, but make sure you make it realistic in terms of their work activities. Of course, both activities should be scored and tracked on a leader board to raise the engagement level even more.

If you have the time and resources, you can certainly create the game or the workshop in-house, but my friends at PharmaCertify (that’s the compliance training division of NXLevel Solutions) have workshops just like the ones I described that are easily customized with your content. I’ve been there when their clients have used their workshops, and wow it is fun to watch the learning! They’d be happy to demo the workshops for you. Just email Tessa Hoyer at thoyer@nxlevelsolutions.com.

Thanks for the question and remember to make it fun and make it memorable!

Your compatriot in compliance training,

Connie

A Preview of the 2019 Pharmaceutical Compliance Congress

The 16th Annual Pharmaceutical Compliance Congress is scheduled for April 16-18, 2019 in Washington DC.

The 16th Annual Pharmaceutical Compliance Congress begins April 16-18 in Washington DC and as is often the case, the agenda promises a compelling mix of presentations covering topics important to new and experienced compliance professionals alike.

Tuesday, April 16th is dedicated to the Congress “prelude” and one of the sessions looks particularly interesting based on its subject matter. Nurse educators are a trending topic in life sciences compliance with the potential for patients misinterpreting the line between medical advice and a commercial sales pitch. The description for the Compliant Nurse Educator prelude includes the timely suggestion that attendees will “gain foundational and operational needed to structure and maintain compliant programs.”

On Day One, Wednesday, April 17th at 11:15 AM, the Highly-Acclaimed U.S. Healthcare Fraud and Enforcement Panel begins with current prosecutors reviewing “Top Enforcement Trends and Focal Points for 2019 and Beyond.” During the Former Prosecutors Panel that follows, three former Assistant US Attorneys will focus on “New Developments on High-Profile and Settlements Uncovering Healthcare Fraud.” The perspective from the regulator side of the table is not readily accessible outside of this type of conference and attendees will be listening carefully for suggestions and tips from those responsible for regulation.

Following the networking lunch (important tip: the networking sessions offer great opportunities to learn from your peers), Day One continues with a series of “content streams” divided by general topic matter.

Patient assistance programs (PAPs) and Patient support programs (PSPs) are certainly under scrutiny (see our recent blog post on the programs here), so we have to recommend Content Stream A: PAPs and PSPs. A team of panelists, including Jennifer McGee from Otsuka, Chetan Shankar from GSK, Francisco Ribeiro Filho of Tesaro and Ann-Marie Tejcek of Eli Lilly will speak in two sessions: Navigate the Complex Legal Landscape of PAPs and Examine PSP Enforcement Trends as Scrutiny Heats Up. Content Stream C: Transparency and Aggregate Spend is also of interest considering the pending expansion of the Sunshine Act to include Advance Practice Nurses and Physician Assistants. It’s time to update that Sunshine Act and Open Payments training!

A series of interactive workshops follow the content streams and I’m looking forward to the Beyond Due Diligence – Auditing and Monitoring Third-Parties session, in particular. Third-party vendor compliance continues to be an area of focus in the industry and Lori Queisser of Teva should bring an important global perspective to the challenges of bringing vendors into compliance as they conduct business of the company’s behalf around the world.

Speaking of hot topics – Interactive Workshop 4: Risks Associated with the Hub and Field Reimbursement Teams so I expect the impressive list of panelists, including Sarah Whipple from Akebia, Joe Philipose from Alexion, and Richard Konzelmann from Sanofi to be speaking to a crowded room of attendees anxious to hear how they are managing the compliance risks that are inextricably linked to the use of Hubs for specialty products.

After a networking and refreshment break at 4:25 PM (don’t forget to stop by the PharmaCertify Booth to see demos of our newest compliance training products), the conference transitions to a series of “think tank sessions.” Frankly, I am not sure of the difference between a workshop and a think tank, but I suppose the changing up the name does make for a more organized agenda.

Anyway, on the think tank front, the Speaker Programs – Best Practice Benchmarking is right at the top of my list. Our recently completed Managing Speaker Program Risk Compliance Foundations™ module is already popular among our client base and for good reason. The programs are fraught with risk at every stage, including planning and execution, and this session, featuring Jennifer McGee from Otsuka again, as well as Maggie Feltz of Purdue Pharma, and Rebecca Spitler of Johnson & Johnson, should prove to be a valuable primmer on how to navigate those risks.

Add Social Media – Practical and Pragmatic Guidance to our target list among the think tanks because, well, it’s social media. We’ll also be in the PAP and PSP Benchmarking – How is the Industry Adapting? think tank to hear how Casey Horton and Stefanie Doebler from Navigant are working with their clients to help minimize program risk.

Day 1 closes with an end-of-day cocktail reception and I do recommend taking the time to attend this important networking event before you run out to dinner. It’s a great opportunity to interact with your peers and learn how they are dealing with some of the same challenges you face every day.

Following the Chairman’s Review of Day One, Day Two, Thursday, April 18th opens with an interesting session titled, From the Trenches: An Inside Look at the Forces and Pressures that Drive People to Violate the Law. The idea of approaching compliance from a higher “ethics” level has been a topic for discussion in recent years and companies are clearly seeking ways to integrate the concepts into their policies and procedures. I’ll be interested to hear how the speaker, who is the CEO of Business Ethics Advisors, LLC, how is working with clients to do just that.

After a session dedicated to recent trends in enforcement, featuring Eric Rubenstein from the OIG and Heather Johnson from the FTC, the agenda takes a turn to the future with Rethinking the Compliance Profession Where Should We Go from Here? Including such forward thinking presentations is appreciated and this look at the future of the industry should dovetail nicely from the opening session on ethics.

Next, attendees choose from what are described as “five in-depth summits.” The Small to Mid-Sized Company Resource Center holds interest for me based on the uniqueness of its title, and simply because I find the small to mid-sized company focused sessions so informative from a standpoint of learning what those with limited resources are doing to address the same challenges their peers at larger companies face.

With HCP interactions still representing so much of the compliance risk companies face, the Compliant Patient Interactions summit should be worthwhile, with an impressive array of industry professionals ideally sharing tips and suggestions for ensuring those interactions are conducted in a compliant manner. Hopefully, training is included on the list of talking points.

Following the final networking luncheon, the conference closes with the reveal of an inaugural benchmarking survey. The agenda does not list what organization conducted the survey, but I’m sure attendees will be listening closely to learn what their peers from “brand/generic, large/small and private/public” companies consider to be their top priorities on the established and emerging compliance risk areas.

Summary

The panel presentations, workshops, think tanks, and summits I touch on in this preview represent just a few of the sessions CBI has planned for this year’s conference. The Pharmaceutical Compliance Congress never fails to deliver the content and networking opportunities industry professionals need to stay abreast of current risk areas, policies, and best practices. I highly recommend the conference for the new and established life sciences compliance professional.

If you are considering the conference but have yet to register, we are still offering discounts on the regular conference registration rate. Contact me at smurphy@nxlevelsolutions.com if you’d like to take advantage of that discount. If you are attending, don’t forget to stop by the PharmaCertify booth to say hi and let me know what you think of our blog. As always, your feedback is appreciated.

Thanks for reading and I will see you in Washington!

Sean Murphy
Editor
Compliance Training Intelligence Blog

Lessons Learned at the 2018 Pharmaceutical and Medical Device Congress

Lesson 3: Learning to Listen

“There is only one rule for being a good talker – learn to listen.”
Christopher Morley

The importance of effective communication and more specifically, listening, wasn’t lost on the speakers at the 19th Annual Pharmaceutical and Medical Device Compliance Congress. The consequences of poor listening were summarized by one panelist on the Qui Tam Roundtable when she said, “the vast majority of whistleblowers who contact me have tried to report their concerns to the company, but the company didn’t want to hear it.” In an era when the nuances of an effective compliance program are discussed and debated in detail, the simple yet often lost art of effective listening needs to be a priority.

The value of listening extends across all departments and business units and it starts with field-based employees. A presenter in the Compliance Considerations for Small to Mid-Size Companies session echoed that sentiment, saying, “the stream of questions from the field is not going to stop, but those questions tell a story and you need to monitor them carefully and build your plan from there.” The data from those responsible for interacting with healthcare professionals is critical as you evolve your program and look for gaps and redundancies that need to be addressed in personal interactions and in your continuous training curriculum. And listening for that data begins with open, non-judgmental relationships across the company. Or, as another presenter in the Compliance Considerations for Small to Mid-Size Companies session stated it, “when employees interact with the compliance department, they should not feel like they are being judged.”

The need for open lines of communication doesn’t stop with the field. The industry trend toward “building a culture of ethics and compliance,” and frankly, the regulatory focus on the culpability of those in the C-Suite and boards of directors, more than ever, dictates the need for open and regular communication with company leadership. The proverbial “seat at the table” for Compliance extends upward in the organization. As was stated during the AUSA Roundtable, “Compliance should have a good relationship with the Chief Executive Officer, and the officers of the company. The two departments need to communicate openly and honestly.” He continued, “when issues do arise, the Department of Justice needs to see that you are being proactive and responding to those issues.” In other words, listening to one and another.

During the Chief Compliance Officer Roundtable, the risks associated with the use of third-party vendors was discussed in detail and the need for open lines of communication beyond the walls of the company was stressed. “Work with the stakeholders in the third party and make them feel like you are partnering with them,” one participant said, “be transparent, if you hear that people aren’t disclosing information, that’s a warning sign. If there is any confusion, ask questions.” And listen carefully to the answers.

The key takeaway: to build a truly effective and modern compliance program that proactively addresses the risks across the organization, a policy of open communication must be established from the top down. The concept of an ethics-based approach to compliance may seem nebulous and difficult to quantify, but it begins with fostering a level of respect across the company. And respect begins with real listening. When employee questions, feedback, concern, and complaints are welcomed, appreciated and nurtured in a respectful manner by Compliance and the C-Suite, all aspects of the compliance program, including the training, are enhanced.

Thanks for reading! I welcome your feedback.

Sean D. Murphy
PharmaCertify by NXLevel Solutions