Previewing the 20th Pharmaceutical and Medical Device Compliance Congress

Visit Tessa Hoyer and the rest of the PharmaCertify team in the Exhibit Hall to see demos of our newest compliance training solutions!

The Pharmaceutical Compliance Forum (PCF) is celebrating a milestone this year with the 20th anniversary of its annual Pharmaceutical and Medical Device Compliance Congress. I have attended the past 12 of these conferences (yikes) and I am consistently impressed with PCF’s ability to create a fresh and relevant agenda while still covering the fundamentals.

The conference is just around the corner (November 6-8 at the Mandarin Oriental Hotel in Washington D.C.) so let’s get the celebration started with a preview of this year’s sessions.

Day 1: Wednesday, November 6, 2019

Pre-Conference Symposia, 8:00 a.m.

Although the conference “officially” opens at 1:00 p.m., four pre-conference symposia are scheduled from 8:00 to 12:00 Noon as follows:

  1. Risk Assessment Recommendations Based on DOJ Updated Guidance
  2. Third-party Interactions, Including Distributors and Non-Distributor Third Party Vendor Compliance
  3. Investigations: Interconnectivity of Auditing, Monitoring, Investigations, Including Privilege
  4. Emerging Role of Analytics, Bog Data & AI Opportunities for Life Sciences: Implications for Ethics and Compliance

All the sessions offer valuable and worthwhile content as described in the agenda, and that makes the decision as to which one to attend even more challenging. Pre-conference Sessions 1 and 2 are consecutive so you can attend both, but you still need to decide between Sessions 3 and 4. Session 3, which is focused on investigations, is described as covering “issues for a big company vs. a small company,” so it certainly has broad appeal. My suggestion is to take a “divide, conquer, and share notes” approach if you happen to be attending with co-workers, or can tag-team with friendly colleagues from other companies.

Opening Plenary Session, 1:00 p.m.

The conference officially begins with a welcome and introduction from the five PCF co-chairs (Sujata Dayal of Johnson & Johnson, Jeffrey Kawalek of Jazz Pharmaceuticals, Jennifer McGee of Otsuka America Pharmaceutical, Donna White of Chiesi, and Joe Zimmerman of Ferring Pharmaceuticals), at 1:00 p.m. I would normally skip over the opening 15 minutes when previewing a conference, but since industry luminaries are involved, I would suggest you stay on high alert for any unexpected and bonus pearls of wisdom.

20th Anniversary Dialogue: Lessons Learned from 20 Years of Pharma and Medical Device Investigations, Prosecutions, Ethics and Compliance, 1:15 p.m.

The celebration kicks into high gear for this 1:15 p.m. session that features no less than seven presenters, including industry leaders Douglas Lankler from Pfizer, and Lori Queisser from Teva Pharmaceuticals, as well as government regulators Daniel Levinson, former Inspector General for the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, and James Sheehan of the Charities Bureau of the New York State Department of Law. It’s an impressive array of experience from both sides of the issues.

Keynotes: OIG Update/ US DOJ Update/FDA Update, 2:15 p.m.

At this point, the government’s perspective will be presented in three consecutive keynotes by Mary Riordan of the Office of Inspector General, Brian Benczkowski of the DOJ, and Thomas Abrams of the FDA. The annual discussions of where the industry has been and what will be next year’s likely focus and workplans, always offer clues as to where compliance professionals should be focusing their efforts and future plans.

Annual Chief Compliance Officer Roundtable, 5:00 p.m.

After a presentation on pricing cost containment, the Annual Chief Compliance Office Roundtable closes Day 1. Although the agenda does not detail the topics to be covered, expect the seven industry professionals listed, including Charlene Davis of Aerie Pharmaceuticals, Sunitha Ramamurthy of Loxo Oncology, and Adam Dubow of Bristol-Myers Squibb, to cover a wide swath of relevant and important topics. Keith Korenchuk of Danaher Diagnostics and Thomas Schumacher of Medtronic will bring a welcomed medical device angle to the discussion.

Adjournment and Networking Reception and 20th Anniversary Party, 6:00 p.m.

I typically highlight the conference networking reception as a can’t-miss opportunity to share information and experiences with other compliance professionals, and to form valuable relationships with industry peers. This year’s compliance congress brings the bonus of an anniversary party so let the noisemakers ring and the champagne flow!

Day 2: Thursday, November 7, 2019

Morning Plenary Session, 8:45 a.m.

Following a series of concurrent breakfast roundtables from 7:15 to 8:15 a.m., and the Co-chair’s Welcome and Introductions, Day 2 kicks off with an interview of the Countess of Frederiksborg, Alexandra Christina. In addition to being a Countess, she is the Chairperson of the Ethics and Compliance Board Committee for Ferring Pharmaceutics and co-author of The Sincerity Edge: How Ethical Leaders Build Dynamic Businesses.

U.S. DOJ and U.S. SEC Update on FCPA Enforcement, 9:15 a.m.

The FCPA is back! Or, at least the topic is back on conference agendas after what seems like an extended absence (or at least from the conferences I attended). Presenters include Robert Dodge of the SEC, David Last of the DOJ’s FCPA Unit, and Gary Giampetruzzi, partner at Paul Hastings and former Head of Government Investigations at Pfizer.

AUSA Roundtable, 10:00 a.m.

John Bentivoglio, Partner at Skadden, keeps the enforcement topics going as he moderates the discussion from the AUSA angle with Rachel Honig of the District of New Jersey, Amanda Massenlam Strachan of the District of Massachusetts, and John Claud, from the Consumer Protection Branch of the DOJ.

Mini Summits Block A, 11:15 a.m.

This is where the agenda gets challenging but potentially rewarding. PCF has scheduled four “blocks” of mini summits (A, B, C, and D) right up to the closing plenary session at 4:45 p.m. As with the pre-conference symposia, a “divide and conquer” approach with your colleagues is recommended. Even if those colleagues aren’t from the same company, make friends, then share notes over dinner or via email the following week. For the sake of brevity, I will highlight one mini summit per block, but please review all options in the agenda to determine your best fit based on your interests, compliance challenges, and company risks.

Mini Summit II: Reduce Compliance Risk Using a Portfolio Approach to Training! (Microlearning Alone is Not the Answer)

I may be a bit biased since I have spent the last 12 years building compliance training and my colleague, Dan O’Connor, is moderating this session. But, with microlearning being all the rage, this promises to be a compelling look at what that term really means, and as importantly, why it is not the one and only panacea for making training stick.

If you work in medical device, please consider Mini Summit VII: Annual Medical Device Roundtable. Kudos to PCF for integrating medical device sessions into the agenda.

Mini Summits Block B, 12:45 p.m.

Mini Summit VIII: Lessons Learned from Enforcement Actions

This session stands out as an opportunity to hear an impressive array of industry leaders, including Tom Glavin from Olympus, William Hrubes of ACell, Puja Leekha of Lundbeck, and Kathleen Boozang, Dean of the Seton Hall University School of Law. Legal actions and settlements have long been the guideposts for where and how regulators focus their efforts and they should be an integral component in the planning of a yearly compliance plan and training curriculum.

Note: attendees dealing with the risk that combination (med device/pharma) products bring should alternatively consider, Mini Summit XIV: Issues with Medical Device/Combination Products.

Mini Summits Block C, 2:00 p.m.

Mini Summit XIX: Compliance – Board Communications: Effective Measurement and Reporting Strategies

Expect a deep dive into a topic that has risen to the forefront of industry concern with this look at the most effective methods for integrating the Board of Directors into the compliance program. Expect Katherine Norris of Berkeley Research Group to lead an informative panel that pleasantly includes a current member of the U.S. Board of Directors for Sanofi, Thomas Costa.

Mini Summits Block D, 3:30 p.m.

Mini Summit XXIII: Social Media Engagement by Manufacturers

Social media seems to be such a moving target for the life sciences industry. Hopefully, this team of industry professionals, including Joanne Kwan of Exelixis and Jessica Sergi of EMD Serono, can offer insight and guidance to an audience sure to be hungry for answers to vexing and evolving questions.

Again, the mini summits listed above are only a few of the sessions offered during this year’s conference. Visit the agenda section of the conference website to review the full list and decide which presentations best meet your needs.

After completion of the mini summits, the Day 2 adjourns with an important and sure to be sobering plenary session on “what pharmaceutical/medical device industries can learn from the opioid cases,” followed by a discussion on the “changing face of the qui tam.”

Day 3: Friday, November 8, 2019

Day 3 features an “industry only best practices think tank,” with Sujata Dayal from Johnson & Johnson and Jacob Elberg, Associate Professor of Law at Seton Hall, followed by a benchmarking survey and table discussion breakouts before the conference closes at 12:00 Noon.

It’s Not to Late to Attend!

The Pharmaceutical and Medical Device Compliance Congress offers compliance professionals the rare opportunity, along with CBI’s conference in the Spring, to interact face-to-face with their peers and learn from leaders in the industry and regulators. From a compliance training standpoint, our organization considers it an invaluable opportunity to hear about the challenges facing pharmaceutical and medical device companies directly from those who matter the most, our clients, colleagues, and friends.

If you’re interested in attending, contact me at smurphy@nxlevelsolutions.com to take advantage of our conference sponsor registration discount.

See you in Washington!

Sean Murphy
PharmaCertify by NXLevel Solutions

Lessons Learned at the 2018 Pharmaceutical and Medical Device Congress

Lesson 3: Learning to Listen

“There is only one rule for being a good talker – learn to listen.”
Christopher Morley

The importance of effective communication and more specifically, listening, wasn’t lost on the speakers at the 19th Annual Pharmaceutical and Medical Device Compliance Congress. The consequences of poor listening were summarized by one panelist on the Qui Tam Roundtable when she said, “the vast majority of whistleblowers who contact me have tried to report their concerns to the company, but the company didn’t want to hear it.” In an era when the nuances of an effective compliance program are discussed and debated in detail, the simple yet often lost art of effective listening needs to be a priority.

The value of listening extends across all departments and business units and it starts with field-based employees. A presenter in the Compliance Considerations for Small to Mid-Size Companies session echoed that sentiment, saying, “the stream of questions from the field is not going to stop, but those questions tell a story and you need to monitor them carefully and build your plan from there.” The data from those responsible for interacting with healthcare professionals is critical as you evolve your program and look for gaps and redundancies that need to be addressed in personal interactions and in your continuous training curriculum. And listening for that data begins with open, non-judgmental relationships across the company. Or, as another presenter in the Compliance Considerations for Small to Mid-Size Companies session stated it, “when employees interact with the compliance department, they should not feel like they are being judged.”

The need for open lines of communication doesn’t stop with the field. The industry trend toward “building a culture of ethics and compliance,” and frankly, the regulatory focus on the culpability of those in the C-Suite and boards of directors, more than ever, dictates the need for open and regular communication with company leadership. The proverbial “seat at the table” for Compliance extends upward in the organization. As was stated during the AUSA Roundtable, “Compliance should have a good relationship with the Chief Executive Officer, and the officers of the company. The two departments need to communicate openly and honestly.” He continued, “when issues do arise, the Department of Justice needs to see that you are being proactive and responding to those issues.” In other words, listening to one and another.

During the Chief Compliance Officer Roundtable, the risks associated with the use of third-party vendors was discussed in detail and the need for open lines of communication beyond the walls of the company was stressed. “Work with the stakeholders in the third party and make them feel like you are partnering with them,” one participant said, “be transparent, if you hear that people aren’t disclosing information, that’s a warning sign. If there is any confusion, ask questions.” And listen carefully to the answers.

The key takeaway: to build a truly effective and modern compliance program that proactively addresses the risks across the organization, a policy of open communication must be established from the top down. The concept of an ethics-based approach to compliance may seem nebulous and difficult to quantify, but it begins with fostering a level of respect across the company. And respect begins with real listening. When employee questions, feedback, concern, and complaints are welcomed, appreciated and nurtured in a respectful manner by Compliance and the C-Suite, all aspects of the compliance program, including the training, are enhanced.

Thanks for reading! I welcome your feedback.

Sean D. Murphy
PharmaCertify by NXLevel Solutions